Restrictions for NFA & Export

First and foremost, Modern Armory, LLC. does not export any of it's products outside of the United States of America.


NFA & Export:


What firearms are regulated under the NFA?

(1) a shotgun having a barrel or barrels of less than 18 inches in length;

(2) a weapon made from a shotgun if such weapon as modified has an overall length of less than 26 inches or a barrel or barrels of less than 18 inches in length;

(3) a rifle having a barrel or barrels of less than 16 inches in length;

(4) a weapon made from a rifle if such weapon as modified has an overall length of less than 26 inches or a barrel or barrels of less than 16 inches in length;

(5) any other weapon, as defined in subsection (e);

(6) a machine gun;

(7) any silencer (as defined in section 921 of title 18, United States Code); and

(8) a destructive device.

[26 U.S.C. 5845; 27 CFR 479.11]



ITAR (International Traffic in Arms Regulations) and the EAR (Export Administration Regulations) are export control regulations run by different departments of the US Government. Both of them are designed to help ensure that defense related technology does not get into the wrong hands. An export license is a general term for both ITAR and EAR controlled items in which the US Government has granted permission to transport or sell potentially dangerous items to foreign countries or parties.


ITAR: The more stringent of the two sets of regulations was written for articles with direct defense-related applications. Articles specifically designed or otherwise intended for military end-use are enumerated on the United States Munitions List (USML) or the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) Annex and therefore controlled by International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) which is administered by the Directorate of Defense Trade Controls (DDTC) at the State Department. Items, services, and information are all covered by the ITAR regulations. The most controlled items are Significant Military Equipment (SME) which have capacity for substantial military utility or capability such as tanks, high explosives, naval vessels, attack helicopters, etc. which are noted on the USML with an asterisk. Some examples include; an export license (DSP-5), exchanging technical emails or teaching how to repair an ITAR-covered item which requires a Technical Assistance Agreement (TAA), and allowing a foreign company to manufacture an item requires a Manufacturing License Agreement (MLA).


EAR: Most other items not specifically listed in the USML, but with the capability to be used for either civilian or military purposes are considered dual use and controlled under the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) which is administered by the Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) at the Department of Commerce (DoC). The Commerce Control List (CCL) is the equivalent list at the DoC to the State Departments USML. The CCL specifically controls for Chemical & Biological Weapons, Nuclear Nonproliferation, National Security, Missile Technology, Regional Stability, Firearm Convention, Crime Control, and Anti-Terrorism. The level of control depends on the country being exported to, destination party, end-use, and Export Control Classification Number (ECCN). Specifically there are 600 Series and 500 Series items that are more strictly controlled than the rest of the CCL, but less strictly controlled than the articles on the USML.